A look at research, proposals & tools to combat misinformation

Following some bad press this week, Elon Musk blew up parts of the Twitterverse by declaring he may start a crowd-sourced service to determine news bias and credibility. (Not a new idea, as Alexios Mantzarlis, director of the International Fact Checking Network quickly pointed out, and one that done sloppily can do real harm.) When a Silicon Valley celebrity like Elon Musk brings up the issue of news trustworthiness, it’s a good time to review progress by a sample of Knight-supported projects and research already underway.

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Mexican authorities carry out arrest warrant for second person in journalist Javier Valdez's murder case

The Special Prosecutor’s Office for the Attention of Crimes Committed against Freedom of Expression (Feadle) of Mexico, with the help of Federal Police, carried out an arrest warrant against Juan Francisco “N,” known as “Quillo,” “for his probable participation in the murder of journalist Javier Valdez Cárdenas, on May 15, 2017,” according to the Attorney General’s Office (PGR, for its acronym in Spanish).

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Trump Administration Removes Language on Freedom of the Press from Justice Department Handbook

The U.S. Attorneys’ Manual is a guide to Justice Department policies written for U.S. attorneys and other department employees. It was edited late last year, for the first time in two decades, with significant changes to the “Media Relations” section—changes experts say reflect a larger Trump administration hostility towards members of the press.

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CU strategizes to better link journalists, public

At the start of the semester, CU journalism professor Mei-Ling McNamara finds students who not only can’t tell her what’s on the front page of any paper any particular day, they don’t know who the secretary of state is. But she doesn’t just throw up her hands. She keeps giving them news quizzes and grading them rigorously. The students soon figure out that they need to stay informed.

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